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N. rhanc n. “arm” (Category: Arm)

⚠️N. rhanc, n. “arm” (Category: Arm)
ᴺS. ^ranc “arm”

A noun appearing as N. rhanc “arm” in The Etymologies of the 1930s derived from primitive ᴹ✶ranku under the root ᴹ√RAK “stretch out, reach” (Ety/RAK). It had the irregular plural form rhengy, presumably from final -ui becoming -y, but this plural was archaic and reformed to rhenc based on normal Noldorin (and later Sindarin) plural patterns.

Conceptual Development: The Gnomish Lexicon of the 1910s had (archaic) G. † “arm, strength” (GL/65), clearly related to ᴱQ. “arm” in contemporaneous Qenya Lexicon from the early root ᴱ√RAHA “stretch forward” (QL/78). The Gnomish Lexicon also had a non-archaic word rath “the full arm, the extent of one’s arm, one’s reach — a measure = 2 feet”, apparently referring to both the arm itself and the reach of the arm, and so functioning as a unit of measure (GL/65).

Neo-Sindarin: Most Neo-Sindarin writers adapt the Noldorin word as ᴺS. ranc “arm” (plural renc) as suggested in Hiswelókë’s Sindarin Dictionary (HSD), since the unvoicing of initial r to rh was a feature of Noldorin of the 1930s but not Sindarin of the 1950s and 60s. Based on the Gnomish usage, this word might also be used as a unit of measure for an arm’s length, about 2 feet.

References ✧ Ety/RAK

Glosses

Variations

Inflections

rhenc plural ✧ Ety/RAK: usual plural
rhengy plural ✧ Ety/RAK

Cognates

Derivations

Phonetic Developments

ON. ranko > rhanc [raŋko] > [raŋkʰo] > [raŋxo] > [raŋx] > [r̥aŋx] > [r̥aŋk] ✧ Ety/RAK
ON. rankui > †rhengy [orkui] > [raŋkʰui] > [raŋxui] > [reŋxui] > [r̥eŋxui] > [r̥eŋgui] > [r̥eŋgy] ✧ Ety/RAK

G. † n. “arm, strength” (Category: Arm)

See N. rhanc for discussion.

Reference ✧ GL/65 ✧ “arm, strength”

Cognates

Derivations


G. rath n. “the full arm, the extent of one’s arm, one’s reach; a measure = 2 feet” (Category: Arm)

See N. rhanc for discussion.

Reference ✧ GL/65 ✧ “the full arm, the extent of one’s arm, one’s reach; a measure = 2 feet”

Derivations